Test Reviews

James and the Giant Peach – Chapter Review

Ch. 1: A young boy named James Henry Trotter loses his parents in an accident at the London Zoo in England when he is four years old. He is sent to live with his cruel Aunts, Sponge and Spiker. There, he leads a lonely, miserable life.

Ch. 2: James performs his endless chores as his Aunts sit idly by, belittling him. They think he is a nuisance. James runs off for solitude.

Chapters. 3/4: James meets an old man with a musty smell who gives him a white sack of magic tiny, extraordinary crystals. The man tells James to use the tongues in a spell that will improve his life.

Ch. 5: James accidentally spills the crystals which disappear into the soil and into the roots of a barren peach tree.

Chapters. 6-8: A single peach grows to an enormous size. Sponge and Spiker hatch a plan to charge one shilling in admission to see it. The first day is a financial success, yet they continue to mistreat their nephew.

Chapters 9-10: James goes into the garden that night to investigate the giant peach. He finds an opening and goes inside, eventually entering the enormous pit.

Chapters 11-13: Once inside the pit, James meets several giant insects: The Old Green Grasshopper, a Spider, a Ladybug, a Centipede, an Earthworm, and a Glowworm (who is providing light in the peach). James learns that they were all enlarged by swallowing the spilled magic tongues that affected the peach itself. Soon, the tired insects fall asleep as James begins to feel a bond developing.

Chapters 14-16: The insects cut the giant peach from the tree. It rolls over Sponge and Spiker, killing them. The peach continues to roll through the countryside and into the village, destroying many buildings and a chocolate factory. It rolls off a cliff and splashes down to float in the Atlantic Ocean.

Chapters 17-18: James and the insects recover from the jostling journey and climb out on top of the peach. As everyone is hungry, James suggests eating small pieces of the peach which everyone does happily.

Chapters 19-22: The peaceful scene is interrupted when sharks appear, biting at the bottom of the peach. Fearing for their lives, the insects turn to James for help. He directs Spider to spin massive amounts of silk to create ropes. Using the Earthworm as bait for hovering seagulls, James snares one of the birds. After 501 seagulls are tethered to the peach, it is lifted out of the water and carried safely into the air.

Ch. 23: The soaring peach is spotted by the Captain of the Queen Mary.

Chapters 24-25: After the insects rejoice in their being saved by Jamesʼ idea, Earthworm and Ladybug argue over whoʼs more beneficial to farmers. Centipede revels at being a pest.

Ch. 26: Centipede slides over the edge of the peach, but is rescued by another silk rope that Spider produces.

Ch. 27: The peach flies peacefully near a large bank of clouds. The peach crew see a group of wispy Cloud Men creating hailstones. Centipede shouts insults at the Cloud Men, angering them. They begin throwing hailstones at the peach. All of the insects are hit and suffer damage. Just as the situation grows desperate, the peach is carried out of range by the seagulls.

Ch. 28: James discovers the hailstones have punctured the peach. Then, they notice the Cloud Men building a massive rainbow. The rainbow is lowered from the clouds by ropes which entangle the peach. The peach crew panic as one of the Cloud Men climbs down a rope toward them. Centipede severs the rope and the Cloud Man falls away. The remaining Cloud Men retaliate by dumping rainbow paint all over Centipede.

Chapters 29-31: The seagulls finally pull the peach away from the rainbow cloud just as the Cloud Men attack again, this time with a gigantic sheet of water. Once again, the team escape disaster as the seagulls fly away. As the peach floats past the rest of the cloud city, the team sees groups of cheery Cloud Women and Children. The Cloud Men were, after all, just protecting their families.

Chapters 32-33: The peach finally crosses the Atlantic and reaches New York City and its skyscrapers. Fear grips the citizens as the peach hovers over them.

Ch. 34: James orders Centipede to cut the ropes in order to lower the peach. Just then an airplane flies above the peach and severs all the ropes at once. The peach plunges downward.

Chapters 35-36: Fearing certain death, James and the insects have a heartfelt goodbye. Then at the last moment, the peach is safely impaled on the Empire State Buildingʼs antenna.

Chapters 37-38: James and the insects are met by the shocked Chief of Police and the Fire Captain of New York City. Frightened by the giant insects, James puts everyone at ease by introducing them. The team is then evacuated safely from the peach. They then ride in an open limousine during a parade!

Chapter 39: We learn that each insect becomes successful and goes on to lead contented lives. Miss Spider and the Silkworm set up a factory and make ropes for tightrope walkers. James ends up living in Central Park inside the peachʼs pit- a monument. He is visited daily by visitors and is never sad or lonely for the rest of his life

Number the Stars

Things to think about for your test:

-Why did Ellen’s mom tell the girls that it was important for the Nazi soldiers to not remember their faces?

-What was the secret of Annemarie’s Great Aunt Birte’s funeral? (Give specific details)

-What was the Resistance, and why did the Nazi soldiers not like the Resistance?

-Why does Uncle Henrick need the handkerchief from the packet?

-Can you create a timeline with 5-7 main, detailed events from the story?

Maniac Magee

Was Maniac Magee a positive or negative influence on Russell and Piper? Why? (Give specific examples from the book).

Why does Maniac run away over and over throughout the story? (Give specific examples from the book).

Maniac needs Grayson, and Grayson needs Maniac. What are three ways that you saw this truth displayed in the story? (Give specific examples from the book).

How did Maniac Magee’s influence on Two Mills change the town by the end of the story? (Give specific examples from the book).

What is a protagonist and an antagonist? At the beginning of the story, which characters were protagonists and which characters were antagonists?

Why did Maniac Magee get so angry at Russell and Piper?

Holes

Conflict: A conflict in literature is defined as any struggle between opposing forces. Usually, the main character struggles against some other force.

  1. Identify the six types of conflicts and an example for each from the novel. Review (see link): Types of Conflicts
  2. Use your character t-chart to identify the characters in the story and their characteristics (physical characteristics and personality traits). List of characters (see link):  Holes- Characters
  3. What is a flashback and how is it used in Holes?

 

Figurative Language

Be able to use ALL figurative language examples correctly (try to create your own):  Alliteration , Onomatopoeia , Simile , Metaphor , Idioms , Personification , Hyperbole , Irony

Vocabulary Practice: Quizlet- Figurative Language

House on the Gulf

  1. Can you give an example of each conflict from House on the Gulf? (Think conflict squares.)
  2. How did Britt’s character change and develop throughout the story? Be specific.
  3. How did the time and place influence the people and events that happened in House on the Gulf? Be specific.

Darby

  1. How did Darby’s character change and develop throughout the story? Be specific.
  2. How did the time and place influence the people and events that happened in Darby? Be specific.
  3. Can you give an example of each conflict from Darby? (Think conflict squares.)

Trouble with Tuck

  1. Think of one example from the story for each type of conflict: person vs. person, self, nature, unknown, society, machine.
  2. How did Helen’s character change and develop throughout the story? Be specific.
  3. How did the time and place influence the people and events that happened in Trouble with Tuck? Be specific.
  4. You will be asked to draw a plot mountain for the entire story. What is the problem or goal, climax (turning point) and resolution.

Tuck Everlasting

  1. Think of one example from the story for each type of conflict: person vs. person, self, nature, unknown, society, machine.
  2. How did Winnie’s character change and develop throughout the story? Be specific.
  3. How did the time and place influence the people and events that happened in Tuck Everlasting? Be specific.
  4. You will be asked to draw a plot mountain for the entire story. What is the problem or goal, climax (turning point) and resolution.

I am David

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